Super Shane

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                 My appendix gave out on me last month.  I had big plans to take my appendix on a lot more adventures with me over the course of my lifetime, but, alas, it was not meant to be. I’ve had a ton of running-related injuries over the course of my running career, (most of them were due to faulty training), that required me to regroup my thought and energy, but something about this “injury” bothered me. I don’t know if it was because I had just started thinking about a fall race or the fact that this came out of nowhere, but I found myself very eager to start running ASAP.  Since I started back up, I am focusing on not taking any run for granted.
                While I was going through the appendix surgery, my friend Shane was going through his battle.  Shane has MS, and ever since I met him he has always inspired and amazed me. Last year he came to me with an idea of running 100 miles to raise funds for the local MS chapter. Shane has been battling the disease for years, and, despite everything, he has always maintained a unwaveringly positive outlook.  While his outlook stays strong, over the past two years or so I have seen his physical energies vary from bouncing around the shop with excitement to looking like complete crap and having a hard time keeping up a conversation. He trains depending on the weather (temperature levels tend to impact individuals with MS) and on his drops in energy levels, for he frequently has the shakes. From November until June 10th, he was set to run 100 miles in less than 24 hours. Unfortunately, his quest was cut short.
                Due to a change in his gait from MS, he has been landing very hard on the outside edge of his foot. Over time, all the miles and pounding have done severe damage to his foot and 33 miles into his journey he had to seek medical treatment. His day was cut short, and his prognosis is still TBD. For now, he is back to cycling, but he is already thinking about another century attempt.  His attitude throughout was unbelievable and inspirational. His resolve has certainly helped me acquire a different view of my own lot in life.
                  Meeting people like Shane has been one of the many added bonuses to opening the shop. I am amazed all the time by the number of amazing people that come in and out.  Next time you are feeling a little burned out or down on your running, pop in for a pub run and I will point out a few local beasts and I promise you will feel buoyed. Not all heroes wear capes; some wear Hoka’s.

We’re going streaking! -From our January Newsletter

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winter-running As the weather changes, (this would be the 17th year that I have run in shorts during the winter). I have run in shorts through blizzards, wind advisories, temperature advisories, sleet, and snow. Wearing shorts in subzero temperatures has become a stupid symbol of my refusal to compromise with Mother Nature –something that I am proud of.

So, why do I do this? Well, it started out because I hated running in pants. I know the technology has improved tremendously since the last time I ran in long pants. But I cannot erase the constraining feeling of those itchy pants. I refuse for something as trivial as pants to take away my enjoyment of running. After I made this vow to myself to only run in shorts I have learned many important lessons. However, if I decide to share some of my tips for running in the cold, and they inspire you to join me on this chilly voyage, you have to give me some credit. Deal?

The first thing I discovered about running in the cold was that as long as my core and fingers were warm, the rest of my body would stay warm too. To compensate for my chilly legs, I usually wear two pairs of gloves and a base layer top with a t-shirt on top. Having a shirt that is tight allows my body heat to stay close to me and keeps me cozy and warm. My other secret is that I like to do some pushups right before I head out. If try to get my heart rate up, and get the blood flowing it can help me stay warm throughout the entire run.

A wise man once told me that you do not need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows… but I am pretty sure there is an app for that. Regardless, when I leave the house I get a feel for the wind, and pick routes that would push against the wind as to run with the wind at my back on the way home. I believe that one of the worst things you can do is start with the wind behind you, get a little sweat going, only to have the sweat freeze onto your body on the way back.

My last tip I learned is from my experience with chest cramps on cold days. I’ve tried everything from inhaling/exhaling exclusively when my foot hits the ground to taking big, deep breaths to help expand my lungs. Nothing seemed to work for me, and I was worried that my days running in the cold would have to end. Finally, one day I tried drinking a hot beverage as I was heading out for my run and boom –no cramps. Now when I am walking out the door I am usually sipping a hot mug of coffee or tea. It seems like if I can get that warmth inside my chest when it starts it keeps me warm my whole run.

There may be a day in the future when I have to end my streak and try running tights or something else, but for now, these tips seem to be working just fine. I am planning another winter of weird looks from people passing by and red, ashy kneecaps. Hopefully, after this article, I will see others taking on the shorts look with me this winter.

Sitting at the Big Boy Table

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From Our November Newsletter, be sure to subscribe to stay updated!
Next week I will be in sunny Orlando at The Running Event, an annual conference for run specialty store owners and staff. This will be my second year attending the event and I had a blast last year, learning tips in retail and seeing all of the new exciting products in the world of running. Last year, I walked in with my head down and I felt that at any minute someone would tap me on the shoulder and tell me that I was not welcome. This year I am going with a whole different mindset and attitude. I feel like after two years of business Run Moore can finally be looked at as equals at events like this.

Last year I made my plans to go with the sole purpose of showing the brands that have failed to bring us on board that we were a serious business with the great potential. I wanted to walk up to the head honcho of Brand: “_____” and tell them they were missing out by not giving Run Moore a chance to sell their product. I wanted to poke someone in the chest and show them my cool new Run Moore shirt and tell them who we were. I assumed I would leave the conference with relationships and contracts from every shoe brand who attended and I figured within a month, I would have them all available for purchase at the shop. Turns out it did not quite happen that way. While I did speak to a few big scary people who would smile and put my business card in a stack of 50 other cards… I felt like no one really cared who I was, or why I was there.

This year – things are different. I went in last year almost apologetic that Run Moore was there. I walked around the convention center like an outsider and while I took in everything I could, I really did not talk to other store owners or get involved with the breakout discussions. My mindset this year is to catch up with my reps and see what’s new for 2017. I am happy to go and learn and listen and if I get the stink eye from other shops, oh well. Run Moore has proved time and time again that this community is here to support us and we are here to support this community. I don’t need to make apologies for what we carry or what we do.

I can’t wait to get down to Orlando and see all the new stuff coming out next year. I’m excited to learn new and exciting information about running an efficient business.  More importantly, I can’t wait to walk in with my head held high and not only represent my shop but the wonderful community we serve.

Run Moore Newsletter: October

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I love Seinfeld. I don’t know if there is a show I’ve re-watched more than Seinfeld. There was an episode when George was trying to think of a new career. George mentioned that he enjoyed sports thought that he could make a good announcer or color man for professional baseball. Jerry burst his bubble when he reminded him that broadcasters tended to be ex-ballplayers. George replied that he did not think it was very fair. This joke was made fifteen years ago, and it tends to hold pretty true across the board in sports. When I tune into watch an NFL game I expect to hear Troy Aikman or Brian Billick breaking down and analyzing the events that are transpiring on the field. What I don’t expect to hear is my local weatherman, who has never taken a snap at even the high school level, telling me why the Ravens are playing in Tampa 2 coverage.

For some reason, when races like the marathon or the Baltimore 10 Miler air the local news team that I watch for traffic are providing the analysis. While they are great at what they do, they usually are not knowledgeable in competitive running. Why put them in that spot? Why not use, I don’t know… professional runners to announce a running event? Within five minutes of my shop, we have a guy who has qualified for the Olympic Trials in various distances for multiple Olympic games. We also have a running author and coach who have assisted runners in the area for years. We even have a college coach who has helped not just collegiate runners, but post-collegiate runners achieve their full potential. I would imagine that any of those guys would do a great job breaking down strategy and form from their unique perspective, providing excellent coverage for viewers.

I do enjoy the feel and the personal stories of the runners who are not going to win but are out there giving it their all. I like seeing the oldest entry (93 years old!) in the half marathon line with his family to tackle the distance together. However, I get frustrated with comments like “well, this marathon is 26.2 miles” and little details such as when they fail to update the women’s race for the first two hours. I don’t enjoy seeing non-runners on camera trying GU Energy and making faces about how weird it tastes. I especially get ticked when the runner who eventually wins was announced as a relay participant for the first half of the race and therefore not a factor. I don’t fault the anchors at all – they are simply doing their job and trying to report the race to the best of their abilities. I just wish they used people in the community who could use their expertise to present the event as an important sporting event, not as an event where 25,000 weirdos show up to jog around downtown Baltimore.

I understand that I am probably a part of the minority as I can watch a marathon and be interested the entire time. I totally get that the network is trying to fill hours and hours of coverage and maybe it is easier to keep non-runners tuned in by having familiar faces of their daily news to provide information.  Maybe next year the news team can just handle the inspirational and human pieces and let the runners manage the race updates? Post your thoughts below on our blog, I would love to hear your opinion!